"Oh, hey uncle..."

Constantine

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#1
Okay, since I've seen it in three games so far, this is officially a thing. A really baffling thing.

It is time for a conversion! On comes the kicking tee - along with one or two children. Team waterbearers or whatever. They hand the tee to the kicker and then proceed to have a conversation with the kicker. While they're kicking.

Example:
"Hey uncle."
*preparing to kick* "Hi sweetie."
"Be a hard kick."
"Yeah. Think I'll get it?"
"Yeah, probly."
"Heh... Nek minnit..."
*kicker then takes the kick - That one was successful*

Really I have no idea what to do when a small person has this conversation with their uncle/cousin/mum. The grades are not super super serious, so telling them to get off the field would be a bit draconian, but the kickers allowing themselves to be distracted just baffles me. Also the prevalence of 'nek minnit' which shows up in at least one of the conversations without fail.

Any ideas what to do? Or why it even happens?
 

bignij

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#2
Excuse my ignorance and at the risk of exposing my self to ridicule if the answer is blindingly obvious, what does 'Nek minnit' mean?
 

Dickie E

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#3
I usually join in the conversation and often have a bet with the kicker regarding whether he will kick it or not.
 

bignij

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#4
I usually join in the conversation and often have a bet with the kicker regarding whether he will kick it or not.
Me too Dickie. If it's a difficult one I'll ask them if they want a pint on it. No one's ever took me up on it and in moments of reflection, I wonder if what I'm doing is wise!
 

Taff

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#5
Strange thing to do during a conversion or PK I agree .... but as long as it's within his given minute, I can't really see a problem. :chin:

There's no "safety issue" to anyone, and as long as the kickers happy to have a chat with his little nephew / niece and doesn't take more time than the book allows him, crack on.

Personally, I'd be more of a "Quiet sonny. This is a big kick and uncle Taff is concentrating" kind of guy, but each to his own. :biggrin:
 
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ctrainor

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#6
Absolutely join in the conversation and remind the tee bringer of their responsibilities always to bring a drink on for the ref
 

didds

, Resident Club Coach
#7
googling seesm to suggest Nek Minnit is NZ street slang for ... "next minute" whichI THINK co0ntextually means "its done and dusted"/"sorted"/"of course".

Not quite sure what the connotations aside from that could be.

Personally I think its great young people are allowed to be included in a safe manner in this way. When I played in Taranaki the 9 year old son of my "landlord" (digs where I stayed) would act as water boy and tee runner etc. Ok he didn't get involved in any conversations - but having a chat hardly seems an issue. Unless this "Nek Minnit" is actually viewed as being swearing in which case maybe in the interests of child protection you might "have a word".

didds
 

bignij

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#9
googling seesm to suggest Nek Minnit is NZ street slang for ... "next minute" whichI THINK co0ntextually means "its done and dusted"/"sorted"/"of course".

Not quite sure what the connotations aside from that could be.

Personally I think its great young people are allowed to be included in a safe manner in this way. When I played in Taranaki the 9 year old son of my "landlord" (digs where I stayed) would act as water boy and tee runner etc. Ok he didn't get involved in any conversations - but having a chat hardly seems an issue. Unless this "Nek Minnit" is actually viewed as being swearing in which case maybe in the interests of child protection you might "have a word".

didds
Thanks Didds. I never thought to Google it! :chin: After my own intensive research! :) I would offer as an alternative, 'lo and behold'. :D
 

Phil E

, Referees/Trains Referees in England
#10
Don't create problems where there isn't one!!

Just concentrate on making sure the kick is legal and within the alloted time.
 

OB..

, Advises in England
#11
At a conversion conversation is no problem, but at a PK there is always the possibility of the kick failing and being run back. I'm not sure the child would appreciate such a close-up view of the game.
 

Adam

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#13
Me too Dickie. If it's a difficult one I'll ask them if they want a pint on it. No one's ever took me up on it and in moments of reflection, I wonder if what I'm doing is wise!
I've earned many a pint when in a one-sided game the kicker has missed a conversion right in front of the posts.
 

SimonSmith

, Referees in America, Rank Bajin!
#14
The kicker of one of the teams I referee regularly actually wants people to talk to her.

When she's concentrating on the kick, she starts to think too much. People talking or making fun of her helps keep her swing relaxed.

Bizarre, but it works
 

Taff

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#15
Apparently Neil Jenkins talks to the Welsh players during kicks for goal. It's no coincidence that one of the best goal kickers in world rugby brings on the tee.
 

Mike Whittaker

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#16
The kicker of one of the teams I referee regularly actually wants people to talk to her.

When she's concentrating on the kick, she starts to think too much. People talking or making fun of her helps keep her swing relaxed.

Bizarre, but it works
Are we talking about playing rugby here, Simon??