Abusing referees

RedCapRef

Rugby Club Member
#21
Where I am now (The Illawarra, NSW) they have match day coordinators for all the off field stuff, which I understand would cover this sort of abuse, I haven't been reffing since arriving on these shores, just coaching and can see the differences between the EMRU land and IDRU on match days.
I could not say which is better but they are different, with the IDRU match day all teams play at the same venue one after the other on the same pitch. Good because it means that more players are available as subs and also the ref from the 3rd grade almost always then becomes AR for grade 2 and both for Grade 1. Usual banter is normally on the sidelines but because of the length of time they can be standing there and at the bar very occasionally I have heard a few people start to go to far. This has always been dealt with by peers or the match day coordinator in plenty of time.

I am also now involved with Coaching Junior Rugby League (Girls Tag) and they have a similar set up there, I have heard of problems but not seen any yet. The difference is quite striking in the level of control that even junior clubs exercise on spectators and coaches across the two codes.
 

crossref

<img src="http://www.rugbyrefs.com/flags/england.p
#22
In our society we only appoint to u17 and u18 , and those are graded higher than many adult games .. so newbies start with adult games and graduate to age grade .
 

didds

, Resident Club Coach
#24
Ultimately they carry the can for the abuse if they refuse to name the supporter in any subsequent investigation.
That idea is totally fine and I don't disagree in principle... but what happens when the "supporter" is genuinely unknown to the home club?

didds
 

crossref

<img src="http://www.rugbyrefs.com/flags/england.p
#25
The more common problem is that the troublesome supporter is totally known to the club, and is in fact one of the blazers, and no one will address the problem
 

OB..

, Advises in England
#26
The more common problem is that the troublesome supporter is totally known to the club, and is in fact one of the blazers, and no one will address the problem
Confronting spectators is rarely advisable. I remember a good but relatively inexperienced referee getting fed up with an obnoxious spectator and demanding to know his name. The spectator sneered "I ain't got no name" and ran away behind a laughing crowd, leaving the referee rather red-faced.

Best is to get the captain to talk to somebody senior from the club and ask him to deal with the offender.
 

CrouchTPEngage

Slowing down these days
#27
Given the OP asked :
"With out naming your societys ,,are you all satisfied with the coaching / mentoring you are getting .
How often do you actually meet .
Are your meetings structured ,,or is it a free for all ."

Crossref, I think we are in the same society albeit maybe different region.

I get observed/assessed about 3 to 4 times per season. The observer is listening to my microphone. I get about 1 exchange ( where I am sent a long way away to calibrate the assessments across regions ). We have monthly regional meeting where the agenda has a main theme e.g. "New Laws", "The Lineout", "Managing the Scrum". Here there is usually a presentation (with video examples) which we discuss in pods and contribute to a common understanding. I find it quite useful, personally.
We'll also get any updates on law clarifications which we are asked to implement.

I assume this is similar to other regions ?

CTPE
 

Pegleg

Rugby Club Member
#28
Things like the lack of communication regarding the 2018 law book can be a big issue . But generally in darkest west Wales we are ok.
 

Marc Wakeham

Moderator Attention - New Usergroup Required
#29
I agree with putting the onus on the clubs. THe home club could find it difficult to deal with an away supporter and it is a potential flash point. So if you can see which side the "pain" is from let each deal with their own.
 

ctrainor

<img src="http://www.rugbyrefs.com/flags/england.p
#30
I've come across serious abuse from "the lone dickhead" five or six times in my career. You should never ignore it.
As others have said, get the captain and the blazers involved and make it clear in that if it continues you are abandoning the game.
Worked every time for me, and I did mean it.l
Make sure you tell your society even if you come to and amicable conclusion which in all my cases I have and been bought apologetic beers.
The lone dickheads never worry me, too experienced and thick skinned but they could ruin the afternoon foer a less experienced colleague and be at it every week.
One of them is now the referee contact at the club!
 

Jolly Roger

<img src="http://www.rugbyrefs.com/flags/scotland.
#31
#27 CTPE
We have monthly regional meeting where the agenda has a main theme e.g. "New Laws", "The Lineout", "Managing the Scrum". Here there is usually a presentation (with video examples) which we discuss in pods and contribute to a common understanding. I find it quite useful, personally.
We'll also get any updates on law clarifications which we are asked to implement.
Exactly the same situation here. Interestingly, at this month’s meeting the theme was referee abuse and a similar situation was raised as an example for discussion. The recommendation was to speak with the captain and coach if the situation became unacceptable and inform them that a referee abuse report would be filed against the club and It was up to them to deal with the situation now in order to demonstrate that they were taking the situation seriously. Under no circumstances should a referee enter into conversation with a spectator.

In the case cited in the OP we don’t know what was said to the referee but if it was serious personal abuse and the club did nothing to intervene then the referee has the option to ignore it or abandon the match. If it was severe enough to call off the game and if the ref had previously asked the captain and coach to intervene without success then I am quite sure that the society would back the ref to the hilt and make a serious representation against the club to the home union.


WRT the 2018 Law Book, reference was made to its existence and availability online. It was stated that there were no new laws and that we should continue refereeing in the same way as before. There was no further discussion as no one was excited by the development.
 

VM75

Player or Coach
#32
In General, players [and spectators] get the level of referee that their level of players skill/expertise deserves. If they are good enough to be a semi pro player or above then they'll get a semi-pro referee etc

The community spectator needs to understand that community referees are unavoidable essentials!

Most of us endure touchline criticism, lots of it is ill-informed, most is white noise & doesn't reach the ears, often we adopt a thick-skinned mentality.

Clubs are often guilty of not self policing their own grassybanks or not challenging the disrespectful shouters that cross from wit & banter into unacceptable commentary.

As for training, I see lots of effort being applied, but i can see why those without management skills might struggle, it takes a special person to referee in the modern community game that is so influenced by TV, money & punditry. Good referees are clear thinking multi-skilled managers of people who operate in an environment of testosterone & collisions & Law bending of the margins !

good luck to all who sail in her.