professional rugby referee

TheBFG

<img src="http://www.rugbyrefs.com/flags/england.p
#2
Shall I go first........................ :shrug:

Firstly, welcome to the forum!

Secondly, you need to join your local referees society and get on to their "development squad" and take it from there :wink:

oh and thirdly, a slightly better use of the English language would help too :wink:
 

beckett50

<img src="http://www.rugbyrefs.com/flags/england.p
#3
Welcome.

As with being successful at anything in life, becoming a successful referee - and being promoted to National Panel and even WR International Panel - will take goal setting, dedication, training, practice, humour, style and loads of hard work, honesty, self analysis, and the ability to pick yourself up when it all goes 'tits-up' and you have a bad day at the office.

Nothing comes easy, especially in an 'elite' sport with a pyramid structure.

Best of luck with your goals
 

OB..

, Advises in England
#4
Wayne Barnes started at 15 and reached the National Panel at 21, so by all means harbour the ambition. However most referees never get that far, but still find it a very satisfying way to spend a Saturday afternoon or Sunday morning. As already said, you need commitment and talent. Make sure you enjoy the journey regardless of how it ends.
Welcome to the site.
 

Joeweston

Rugby Club Member
#6
Thanks for the help I am a member of a society I am willing to pot the effort in. .
i can not spell as well as I would like becouse i have dyslexia

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Thanks for the help I am a member of a society I am willing to pot the effort in. .
i can not spell as well as I would like becouse i have dyslexia
 

Joeweston

Rugby Club Member
#7
[h=2]
Re: professional rugby referee[/h]
Thanks for the help I am a member of a society I am willing to pot the effort in. .
i can not spell as well as I would like becouse i have dyslexia​
 
#8
Re: professional rugby referee


Thanks for the help I am a member of a society I am willing to pot the effort in.

i can not spell as well as I would like becouse i have dyslexia
Good. Good luck.

Ignore BFG he was bottle fed scrumpy cider :bday:
PS ...we will expect to see you RC #6's for repeatedly yapping at you and putting the ball into the second row of the scrum .... :pepper::biggrin:
 

Pegleg

Rugby Club Member
#11
Good luck with your ambitions.

Ask questions think about the answers given and ask if and why they differ from your own answers.

Set short and long terms aims (Small and big wins). For example: Ref 10 games before Christmas. = Small win. Ref the RWC. = BIG win.

Accept that every now and then you'l lhave a poor game. Learn from them as much as the good ones.

Don't believe a player when he says you were the best ref he's ever had (especially props). What he really means is either: 1, his team won. or 2, he got away with murder.

By the same token if a player says you were crap, it could well mean that you were indeed poor today OR that everytrhinf he tried you were wiase to or his team lost.

Take praise and criticism from players and coaches with the same pinch of slt

Listen to your assessors and to other refs.

If you have no game go and watch a ref at your level, watch their positioning learn what works and what does not work. talk to them.

Don't take your positioning from the elite guys. They have ARs and TMOs you do not. You need to be in different poositions to Barnes, Owens etc.

When your fit enough.......................get fitter!

Concerning the dyslexia. Don't worry! when it comes to report writing etc there will be plenty of people in your society who will help you all the way.
 
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SimonSmith

, Referees in America, Rank Bajin!
#12
Much of what Pegleg writes is good.

I'd add- worry about what you can control. You can control your fitness, your law knowledge, things like that.
There will be things that you can't control - demands of work conflicting with rugby, perhaps. You need to let go of the angst of that.

And make sure your partner is supportive -refereeing is a big commitment, even if you aren't Elite-bound. Someone who will support you in your endeavours will make life a lot easier.

And above all - enjoy it

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You were supposed to find the 'joke' about dyslexia funny.
 

Dixie

<img src="http://www.rugbyrefs.com/flags/england.p
#13
Lots of good advice here Joeweston - and don't worry about the written stuff. We can all understand what you write, and there is no requirement for written perfection in refereeing.

I would mention that you need a very strong backup plan in case you don't make it to the top. There are only about 50 National Panel referees (or above) in the whole of the UK, and very few of those make enough from reffing to give up the day job. Some have found work with the RFU to enable them to earn a living from rugby, but the vast majority even of the Top 50 do a day job and fit their training and reffing around it.

If you think about the numbers, there are about 50 paid professionals at any pro game - and only one of them is a referee. It is much harder to get high enough to earn a living in this role than it is in any other aspect of pro rugby, so the importance of a backup plan cannot be overstated.
 

Dickie E

<img src="http://www.rugbyrefs.com/flags/australia
#14
and don't argue the toss with your assessors, mentors, coaches, whatever they are called these days. Take all feedback on board, discuss, digest and use what is beneficial. You don't want a reputation as a know-it-all.