prevents a quick throw

OB..

, Advises in England
#41
...and particularly if the referee's continual ignoring of a Law or Laws is having a material effect on the game, and disadvantaging the captain's team.
I have quoted before a game where the committee man who had volunteered to referee did not turn up. 30 players, no ref, so the home team captain said "I suppose I had better do it." When we went across to the pitch, there was a lone spectator. Apparently he was a regular, so the captains agreed to ask him if he would referee, and he agreed.

It quickly became apparent that he had never played the game. At a 22 dropout, he penalised a team for not being 10m back. At another penalty the team opted to kick for goal, then ran the ball and "scored". He allowed it. "Knock-on" was not in his vocabulary.

The first half was a shambles, and our opponents deliberately capitalised. At half time we said this was ridiculous, and it was agreed that we would tell him when he needed to stop play. This worked surprisingly well - better than just abandonning the game.

However it did require the compliance of the "referee".
 

Rushforth

<img src="http://www.rugbyrefs.com/flags/holland.p
#43
...and particularly if the referee's continual ignoring of a Law or Laws is having a material effect on the game, and disadvantaging the captain's team.
Ian_Cook, welcome to these forums. I realise you are not a referee at present. I don't know when you last refereed.

The last time I was a captain was almost exactly half my lifetime ago, in the early 90s. Shortly after that period (still before the professional era) I had my sole monent of genuine strop at a referee (who allowed play to continue because the ball was 'almost out' of a collapsed scrum, in a friendly between two teams of which I was a member of both). Before that I had not 'questioned' a single decision since I was 14 years old.

Captains as interested as I in the safety of their players? I will listen.

Captains insisting on telling me the technicality of each and every infringement by the opposition - but never of their own side - I will start to ignore.

The laws are there to be ignored by referees. I'm still ignoring the crooked feed at scrum too much, myself, but no more than the elite refs do.

Captains offering feedback over genuine safety issues, always taken on board. Captains or players complaining about the letter of the law will be internally scoffed at. If I'm not whistling it is because I've either not seen it or playing advantage ... over. I can only deal with genuine 'safety' requests above that.
 

Na Madrai

<img src="http://www.rugbyrefs.com/flags/england.p
#44
In most cases, I would be awarded a penalty fifteen meters in for the opponent preventing the quick throw in.

In the event of a punch, it normally resulted in a red card for the opponent for retaliation and a warning for meself that '...the next time, you're on your own!'

Very occasionally, the comment would be '...you asked for it...' and play continued with the line out.

NM
 
#45
Very occasionally, the comment would be '...you asked for it...' and play continued with the line out.

NM
Really ?!! ...... A player deliberately blows a QTI & offends, & (accidentally on purpose) gets a ball in the snout as a consequence, he then punches the thrower and you might let him off .....

Not for me Na, not even very occasionally.
 

Na Madrai

<img src="http://www.rugbyrefs.com/flags/england.p
#46
Not I Browner, just some of the referees I had in my, far too long ago, playing career, especially had I played against - or even with - them!!!!!

NM
 
#47
Whilst not mirroring the OP, this clip does give some validation to the PK &YC theory when dealing with QTI 'interferences'

http://www.sareferees.com/laws/view/2830705/

In addition, the SA norm is YC, apparently.

Esterhuizen clearly was offending and he was doing it with the intention of preventing a quick throw-in - intentionally in other words.The referee had three courses of action:
admonish
caution
send off.


admonishment = warning
caution = yellow card, i.e. sin-binning
send off = red card.

The referee chose the middle one as has become the norm in South Africa.
If only Nigel Owens had dealt with Huget properly , England might have had a Grand Slam ...oh wait!
 
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