[In-goal] Ball taken into in-goal or not ?

CrouchTPEngage

Slowing down these days
#1
In last weekend's game, I made a decision which, nobody complained about at the time, but I remember thinking "I'll check that later with the rugbyrefs forum". My uncertainty is exacerbated by this year's law trial changes.

Blue v Red. Blue are attacking, about 30 metres from Red's goal line. Blue 10 places a nice chip-kick for his right winger to chase. It bounces about 1 metre from the goal line and , the defending Red 15 had turned and is sprinting backwards to try to recover the ball. The ball bounces about 3 meters into the air and ( i judge ) is just about touching the plane of the goal line. Red-15 , aware of the on-rushing attacker, jumps on the air to catch the bouncing ball. He jumps from the field of play and contacts the ball over the goal line. He lands into in-goal and touches the ball down.

I award a 22 , explaining that the ball had reached the plane of the goal-line, hence the defender hadnt carried it into his own in-goal area.
Was this right ?
 

didds

, Resident Club Coach
#2
I think you could make just about any call and not get challenged TBH. If you are certain that it was over the line's plane then its in goal.

Cue several hundred posts now...

didds
 

Pinky

<img src="http://www.rugbyrefs.com/flags/scotland.
#3
CTPE, I think you made the right call and that is what the law change was about AFAIK. Like Didds says, you could make just about any call, but explaining your call like you did often helps. For example shouting "went backwards" if a catcher drops a ball makes it clear that it is play on and even if some folks don't agree with your plumb bob, they at least know what you think and why you are allowing play to go on.
 

crossref

<img src="http://www.rugbyrefs.com/flags/england.p
#4
As I understand the Laws it's all about the plane of the goal line -- had the ball reached/crossed the plane when he caught it.

And of course if it's a close one then from where you are standing you've got no way of making that judgement.

So I'd say - if you can't tell (ie it was caught around the plane, there or thereabouts) give the catcher the benefit of the doubt and give a 22m dropout
 

ChuckieB

Rugby Club Member
#6
As I understand the Laws it's all about the plane of the goal line -- had the ball reached/crossed the plane when he caught it.

And of course if it's a close one then from where you are standing you've got no way of making that judgement.

So I'd say - if you can't tell (ie it was caught around the plane, there or thereabouts) give the catcher the benefit of the doubt and give a 22m dropout
raises the question as to when to give the attacking side the benefit and when to give the defending side the benefit of the doubt?
 

Andrew1974

<img src="http://www.rugbyrefs.com/flags/england.p
#8
Explanation sounds right to me.

I’m sure 50% thought you were right, and 50% didn’t, but I guess that is always the case with a marginal call that, had it been a few inches different could have gone the other way.
 

ChrisR

Player or Coach
#9
. . . . . and 90% had no clue as to current law and 99% couldn't discern the ball's position relative to the goal line. You were the 1% and the only one who's opinion counted. (And you got it right)
 
#11